George Allen "Pat" Summerall

Student-Athlete/Broadcaster
Inducted 2006

One of the nation's most famous sportscasters, George Allen "Pat" Summerall's stellar career began as a four-sport high school athlete in Lake City.

Summerall graduated from Columbia High School in 1948, where he earned three letters in both football and basketball, as well as two in baseball and one in tennis. He was an All-State selection in football and basketball, and played as a junior on the state championship basketball team.

Summerall earned a scholarship to the University of Arkansas for basketball, and was an All-Southwest Conference selection in football and basketball twice, leading the nation in football field goals with three in 1950. He received a degree in education and later earned a master's degree in Russian history. He went on to play 10 seasons in the NFL for the Chicago Cardinals and the New York Giants, playing in the 1958, 1959 and 1961 NFL championship games and scoring five points in the legendary game against Baltimore in 1958. Summerall scored a total of 567 points during his professional football career, and also enjoyed a brief career with the St. Louis Cardinals baseball organization.

He began working as a broadcaster for CBS in 1960 and became one of the nation’s best-known sportscasters. Summerall supplied the voice for much of the network's sports coverage until 1994, when he and partner John Madden joined the Fox network. He has broadcasted 16 Super Bowls on network television and 10 on the radio, as well as covering The Masters and the U.S. Open Tennis Championship. Summerall retired in 2003.

Summerall has received the industry’s highest honors, including the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award and the Lifetime Achievement Award for Sports from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. He has been awarded the NFL Alumni's Order of the Leather Helmet, and received the fourth-ever George Halas Award in 2002. Summerall is a member of the Florida Sports Hall of Fame, American Sportscasters Association Hall of Fame, and the National High School Hall of Fame.